Jordan Jeter

Jordan Jeter

Associate

503.802.2076
jordan.jeter@tonkon.com

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Services & Industries

Education

J.D. Order of the Coif, University of Washington School of Law, 2016

B.A., cum laude, Political Science, University of Washington, 2013

Bar & Court Admissions

Oregon State Bar

Jordan is an attorney in Tonkon Torp’s Labor & Employment Practice Group, working with employers to create solutions to complex employment matters. Jordan has particular insight into the appeals process, having worked as a judicial clerk for the Honorable Roger DeHoog of the Oregon Court of Appeals (now on the Oregon Supreme Court), and the Honorable Barbara A. Madsen of the Washington Supreme Court. She also worked as an appellate intern at the Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office during law school. Prior to joining Tonkon Torp, Jordan was a litigation associate at McKean Smith Law.

Outside of the office, Jordan enjoys exploring the city with her two young sons, bicycling, and playing mahjong with friends.

Community Involvement & Activities

Multnomah Bar Association
YLS Service to the Public Committee


Professional Memberships

Multnomah Bar Association

Oregon Women Lawyers

Tonkon Torp Labor & Employment Group Welcomes Jordan Jeter

Tonkon Torp LLP welcomes associate Jordan Jeter to its Labor & Employment Practice Group.

Washington State Significantly Limits Nondisclosure and Nondisparagement Agreements

By Jordan Jeter – Washington State’s “Silenced No More Act”—one of the nation’s strictest prohibitions against nondisclosure and nondisparagement agreements—went into effect on June 9, 2022. The Act replaces an earlier 2018 law and expands the definition of “employee,” broadens the types of agreements subject to restrictions, limits exceptions, and provides greater penalties for violations.

Publications & Presentations

“Get Ready for Paid Leave Oregon,” Tonkon Torp Legal Update, May 2022

State v. Crumpton: How the Washington State Supreme Court Improved Access to Justice in Post-Conviction DNA Testing,” Washington Law Review, 2015