Tonkon

Trends in Drinking Water: Part Two – Poop Water

Water Law


2/15/2018 by Janet Neuman

Trends in Drinking Water: Part Two – Poop Water
At the other end of the spectrum from raw water is "poop water"—sewage effluent that has been transformed back into safe drinking water. Whereas raw water is completely untreated, poop water—or "direct potable re-use" if you want a more palatable euphemism—is very highly treated, for obvious reasons. Drinking reclaimed sewage water is hardly a new idea; in fact, if you live downstream from an urban area, you may already be doing so to some degree. A few years ago, Bill Gates drank reclaimed water publicly and repeatedly —even on national TV with Jimmy Fallon —to promote a company developing treatment plants for developing countries. A couple of years before that, the film Last Call at the Oasis featured Jack Black drinking the stuff. For the most part, the movement to reclaim sewage effluent for drinking water stays under the radar, since the biggest barrier to widespread adoption is negative public perception—the "yuck" factor.

Trends in Drinking Water: Part One – Raw Water

Water Law


2/9/2018 by Janet Neuman

Trends in Drinking Water: Part One – Raw Water
The water news popping up in my email inbox recently has really run the gamut. One of the latest health fads is apparently drinking "raw water"—meaning unprocessed and untreated water. At the other end of the spectrum, there are a couple of new proposals to drink "poop water"—water produced by thoroughly treating sewage effluent to meet drinking water standards. First, a look at raw water. The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, and even The Oregonian have featured stories about the raw water craze. One of the sources of this hot new product is here in the Northwest—Opal Spring, in Central Oregon—the source of the Crooked River.

New Clean Energy Jobs Bills Seek to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Oregon

Energy, Environmental


2/1/2018 by Jeanette Schuster

New Clean Energy Jobs Bills Seek to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Oregon
The Oregon legislature is currently in the process of figuring out how the state will (or won't) deal with the greenhouse gas emissions made by Oregonians that are negatively impacting the world's climate. Substantially similar drafts of the Clean Energy Jobs Bill (SB 1070) were released on January 8 in both the Senate (Legislative Concept 44) and the House (Legislative Concept 176). Besides a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, the bill's goal is to "promote carbon sequestration and adaptation and resilience by this state's natural and working lands, communities and economy in the face of climate change and ocean acidification."

The Future of Freight

Manufacturing, Real Estate and Land Use


1/26/2018 by David J. Petersen

The Future of Freight
By now we've all heard about receiving Amazon packages by drone. Drones haven't cornered this market, though – there are also robots. But these are just the tip of the iceberg for cool new ways for stuff to get delivered more efficiently. Here's a review of some other ideas in the works, starting simple and working up the freakiness ladder.

The "Disastrous" Costs of Climate Change

Environmental, Real Estate and Land Use


1/19/2018 by Janet Neuman

The
"Natural" disasters cost the United States a record amount of $306 billion in 2017, topping the previous record of $215 billion in 2005, the year of Hurricane Katrina. This past year also tied with 2011 for the highest number of billion-dollar disasters—a total of 16. The events included floods, fires, storms, droughts, and freezes—pretty much everything except the locusts and the plague—according to the folks at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Centers for Environmental Information, whose job it is to keep track of these statistics.

Portland's Fossil Fuel Terminal Ban Upheld by Court of Appeals

Energy, Environmental, Manufacturing, Real Estate and Land Use, Water Law


1/10/2018 by Jeanette Schuster

Portland's Fossil Fuel Terminal Ban Upheld by Court of Appeals
On January 4, 2018, the Oregon Court of Appeals issued its decision in the case brought by Petitioners Columbia Riverkeeper, Portland Audubon Society, and Center for Sustainable Economy, among others, to attempt to uphold the City of Portland's new "Fossil Fuel Terminal Zoning Amendments" adopted December 14, 2016 under Ordinance No. 188142 ("FFT Ordinance"). The FFT Ordinance would stop the expansion of existing fossil-fuel terminals and significantly limit the size of new terminals within the City of Portland. This ordinance was originally challenged by industry groups Columbia Pacific Building Trades Council, Portland Business Alliance, Western States Petroleum Association, and Working Waterfront Coalition in a case against the City of Portland before the Land Use Board of Appeals.

Why Mapping Apps Keep Traffic Engineers Up at Night

Real Estate and Land Use


1/5/2018 by David J. Petersen

Why Mapping Apps Keep Traffic Engineers Up at Night
By now, we've all used a mapping app -- like Apple Maps, Google Maps and Waze – to find the best way from point A to point B. A primary attraction of the apps is that they can filter traffic conditions in real time and provide the quickest route to your destination, which may not always be the most direct. Many times, the apps direct drivers onto residential side streets not designed for through traffic or additional volume. For traffic engineers, this can be a big headache. The traffic grid is designed primarily to move large numbers of vehicles as safely as possible. Design choices are made based on expected traffic under normal conditions. The mapping apps, on the other hand, serve the individual driver's desire for flexibility and convenience based on real time conditions in the moment.

Water Win-Win

Water Law


12/28/2017 by Janet Neuman

Water Win-Win
In case you haven't noticed, Washington County is booming. For many years, the County's population has been growing at around 2% annually and its current population of more than 580,000 is second only to Multnomah County's 800,000. Growth means thirst and the area's water providers are getting ready. The Willamette Water Supply Program, which is a joint effort between the Tualatin Valley Water District and the City of Hillsboro, is working on a very big infrastructure project. You could call it "Big Pipe 2." Unlike the City of Portland's original Big Pipe project, which was designed to stop dirty water from running into the Willamette River, Washington County's project will take water out of the Willamette in Wilsonville and carry it to Hillsboro and other parts of Washington County through more than 30 miles of pipe.

Portland Residential Home Energy Score Requirement Takes Effect January 1

Real Estate and Land Use


12/14/2017 by David J. Petersen

Portland Residential Home Energy Score Requirement Takes Effect January 1
Starting January 1, 2018, single-family home sellers in Portland will be required to report a Home Energy Score (HES) to potential buyers. The HES is a federally-developed measurement of the energy-related use and associated costs for a home, and is scored between 1 and 10. A HES of 5 means that the home's energy use is comparable to the average Portland home. A score of 10 places the home in the top 10% most energy-efficient homes in the city; a score of 1 places it in the bottom 15%. The HES can be used to qualify for energy-efficiency financing through Fannie Mae and FHA, and properties with a good HES (6 or higher) will stretch some lenders' debt-to-income ratio requirements, making it easier for buyers to qualify for a mortgage.

Willamette Falls Riverwalk Moving Forward Despite Adversity

Environmental, Real Estate and Land Use, Water Law


12/8/2017 by David J. Petersen

Willamette Falls Riverwalk Moving Forward Despite Adversity
Willamette Falls, between Oregon City and West Linn, is the second-largest waterfall in the US by volume. Home of the nation's first hydroelectric project in 1888, the falls have largely been cut off from public view since then by industrial development, including the former 23-acre Blue Heron paper mill on the river's edge in Oregon City. A coalition of local governments led by Metro aim to change that with an ambitious public Riverwalk on the east bank of the falls. With a budget of $25 million, half of it coming from state sources, designers envision the Riverwalk as a public walkway through the Blue Heron site and across PGE's operating hydroelectric dam to a viewpoint on the falls' edge

{{title}}

{{categories}}


{{date}} {{author}}

{{summary}}