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Mall Expansion in Beaverton is Taking Off

Real Estate and Land Use


4/24/2017 by Jeanette C. Schuster

Mall Expansion in Beaverton is Taking Off
The expansion of Cedar Hills Crossing mall in Beaverton, located on SW Cedar Hills Boulevard approximately between Hall Boulevard and Walker Road, is well underway. The buildings that needed to make way have been razed and the site now looks poised for construction work. The existing mall has an interesting history. Originally, it was the site of Bernard's Airport, which was a non-commercial airfield and one of two private airports located in Beaverton. In 1969, the airport shut down and the site was redeveloped as "Bernard's Beaverton Mall." In 2002, Vancouver development company C.E. John Company expanded and redeveloped the mall and renamed it "Cedar Hills Crossing." Current anchor tenants include New Seasons Market, Powell's Books, Best Buy, Old Navy, and WinCo Foods. The mall also has a movie theater, a bowling alley, a gym, and a health clinic.

Is Property Tax Reform Coming to Oregon?

Real Estate and Land Use


4/18/2017 by Michael Mangan

Is Property Tax Reform Coming to Oregon?
As our state faces a $1.6 billion budget shortfall, lawmakers are considering a number of ways to raise taxes to bridge the gap. One current proposal asks Oregonians to reconsider Measure 50, their 1990s-era property tax revolt. Senate Joint Resolution 3 (SJR3) – would amend Oregon's Constitution and do away with Measure 50. Property taxes would be based on real market values instead of the formulaic "Assessed Values" we have now.

One of the Ways in Which Portland is Not Like Los Angeles

Water Law


4/12/2017 by Janet Neuman

One of the Ways in Which Portland is Not Like Los Angeles
I recently attended the American Bar Association's 35th Annual Water Law Conference in Los Angeles. On opening day, we toured parts of the Los Angeles River Revitalization Project. As often happens when I visit other cities, I am reminded of how incredibly lucky we Oregonians are to have so many beautiful rivers—even those that run right through our towns and cities. Try to picture the Willamette in Portland as just a trickle of water running in the bottom of a cement canyon—that's the LA River, and what a sad-looking river it is. A hundred years ago, both the Los Angeles River and the Willamette River flowed in braided channels through wide, vegetated floodplains—home to Native Americans sustained by the local fish and wildlife.

Industrial Land Boom in Portland Still Can't Keep Up With Demand

Real Estate and Land Use


4/7/2017 by David J. Petersen

Industrial Land Boom in Portland Still Can't Keep Up With Demand
2016 saw the addition of 2.3 million square feet of new industrial space in the Portland Metro region, slightly less than was added in 2015 but otherwise the largest annual growth since before the Great Recession. But that was not enough to meet demand, which outpaced supply by almost 50% in 2016. New, large industrial tenants include Amazon, which by the end of 2018 will have over 1.1 million square feet of industrial space leased in the Metro area. Vacancy rates fell to 3.5% (a 15-year low) and rents are up 16% year-over-year.

A Case Study on the Accuracy of Real Market Values on Tax Statements

Real Estate and Land Use


3/30/2017 by Michael Mangan

A Case Study on the Accuracy of Real Market Values on Tax Statements
In my previous Ear to the Ground post, I discussed real market values and how they can become inaccurate on your tax statement. For this week’s post, I wanted to offer a real-life example of how this discrepancy played out for a client of mine and how we resolved the problem in my client’s favor. About five years ago, I received a call from a client upset with his County assessor. He owned an industrial building along the I-5 corridor and building next door – which had been constructed within a few years of his with the exact same architectural plans – had recently sold for $5 million. Yet when my client received his tax statement, his real market value ("RMV") was still assessed at $10 million.

Is the Real Market Value on Your Tax Statement Accurate?

Real Estate and Land Use


3/23/2017 by Michael Mangan

Is the Real Market Value on Your Tax Statement Accurate?
One of the most common questions asked about property tax in Oregon is whether the assessor's real market value ("RMV") is accurate. The short answer is, probably not. There are two reasons for this. First, Measure 50, passed in Oregon in 1997, has taken the focus of assessors away from real market values and turned it toward formula-driven assessed values. I'll be addressing our legislature's efforts to unwind Measure 50 in a future post.

Housecalls Are No Longer a Thing of the Past

Real Estate and Land Use


3/16/2017 by David J. Petersen

Housecalls Are No Longer a Thing of the Past
If you know what a housecall is, you've dated yourself. If your doctor has ever made a housecall to you, you've really dated yourself. Or maybe not, as housecalls are staging a comeback – recent data shows they can save serious healthcare dollars. Portland-based nonprofit Housecall Providers leads the way, providing in-home medical services for homebound patients across the Metro area. The range of care provided by Housecall Providers and similar service providers covers all stages of life, from primary care through hospice services. Transitional care to manage recovery following emergency room visits and hospitalizations is emphasized, to improve the healing process and reduce the likelihood of a return to the hospital.

Gunderson Marine Barge Launch—More than Just a Vessel

Environmental, Manufacturing


3/9/2017 by Jeanette C. Schuster

Gunderson Marine Barge Launch—More than Just a Vessel
Last month, I attended Gunderson Marine's launch of the OneDREAM, an articulated barge built for Harley Marine Services with a capacity of over 80,000 barrels and a length of 428 feet. What struck me most about the whole affair, standing amidst 200-ton whirley cranes, gigantic hulks of steel, and robust workers watching the proud affair, is that there were tears. Tears! People get emotional about a barge launch.

Portland Loves Coworking

Real Estate and Land Use


3/2/2017 by David J. Petersen

Portland Loves Coworking
Portland is already the ninth-largest market in the U.S. for coworking space, and that was before WeWork signed a lease for 30,000 more square feet on the top floor of Pioneer Place in January. The new WeWorks space in Portland joins their other coworking space in the former customs house in Old Town, as well as coworking facilities offered by CENTRL Office, Collective Agency, TENPod, and probably others too. For those of you trapped in your cubicles or a traditional office with four walls and a door (maybe a window if you're lucky), coworking is a style of shared workplace for members that provides typical office amenities like conference rooms, printing and copying, and coffee. Membership levels provide varying levels of use rights, from shared use of a common work area to reserved desks and traditional offices.

It Doesn’t Take a Weatherman...

Environmental


2/23/2017 by Janet Neuman

It Doesn’t Take a Weatherman...
Actually, sometimes it does take a weatherman. Or a weatherwoman, as long as he or she is a real meteorologist, with an actual degree in SCIENCE, as Bill Nye the Science Guy might say. A month ago, when record snow was dumping on Portland and across the state, the Oregonian ran an article titled: "There’s snow in Portland, so is global climate change even real? Yes, say scientists." National Weather Service meteorologist Jon Bonk explained to the reporter why the record snowfalls and cold temperatures in Portland do not disprove climate change, or “global warming” as some non-scientists still call it. My favorites of his quotes: “’Climate’ is what you expect, but ‘weather’ is what you actually get.” “A single weather event doesn’t prove anything about climate change.”

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